Rear-end crashes are the most common type of collision

Posted 8/19/20

Rear-end crashes are, by far, the most common manner of vehicle collision in Arizona.

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Rear-end crashes are the most common type of collision

Auto accident involving two cars on a city street
Auto accident involving two cars on a city street
iStockphoto
Posted

Don’t tailgate and don’t speed. According to Arizona’s vehicle crash data, following those simple instructions will help keep you safe on the roads. That’s because rear-end crashes are, by far, the most common manner of vehicle collision.

Of the 111,090 multi-vehicle crashes that occurred during 2019 in Arizona, nearly half, 47,936, were rear-end crashes, making it the most common manner of collision. The next highest?

Left-turn crashes totaled 18,903. Head-on crashes were among the least common, accounting for only 1.8% of all crashes.
The best way to avoid causing a rear-end collision is to not speed and to leave plenty of space between you and the vehicle in front of you.

Of course, obeying the speed limit and not tailgating are only two of many simple things motorists can do to keep themselves and others safer on roads. Not driving distracted, using turn signals and wearing a seat belt will help keep drivers safe, too.

Remember, if you’re involved in a collision on a highway, your vehicle is drivable and there are no serious injuries, the safest thing to do is move your vehicle to the shoulder where you can inspect it for damage and exchange information with other drivers.

This is called “quick clearance" and provides a safer environment for you and crash responders, and keeps travel lanes clear for other vehicles, reducing the chance of a secondary collision.

Doug Pacey is a communications project manager for the Arizona Department of Transportation. Visit azdot.gov.

ADOT, crash, Pacey

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