Arts

Art used to transform former Phoenix well site

Posted 5/5/22

The city of Phoenix Water Services and Office of Arts + Culture collaborated to transform a previously inaccessible lot into an engaging sculpture garden at 63rd Avenue and Osborn Road.

The …

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Arts

Art used to transform former Phoenix well site

Posted

The city of Phoenix Water Services and Office of Arts + Culture collaborated to transform a previously inaccessible lot into an engaging sculpture garden at 63rd Avenue and Osborn Road.

The Neighborhood Vista project was established to enhance the former Well Site 156, a decommissioned well that provided water to the surrounding neighborhood as far back as the 1940s.

With the well site no longer active, the lot housing the well offered little continued benefit to the surrounding community. In 2019, this site was selected as the fourth location to be developed as part of the Community Well Enhancement Program.

Local artist Jeff Zischke saw the space as an opportunity to create a sculptural garden that tells the story of the past, present, future, and diversity of the community that has grown around, partly because of, the historical well.

This space integrates large steel sculptures with indigenous flora, connected by a walking path that provides in of the sculptural elements.

An interactive story map is available, providing historic context for the site, details about the design process, and insights from the artist.
The site was dedicated on May 4.

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