Culinary program has more than cooking classes for at-risk youths

Posted 7/19/20

In addition to appetizers, antipasto salad, entrée and dessert, at-risk youth from Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health Arizona brought personal development and job readiness to a recent luncheon.

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Culinary program has more than cooking classes for at-risk youths

Posted

In addition to appetizers, antipasto salad, entrée and dessert, at-risk youth from Devereux Advanced Behavioral Health Arizona brought personal development and job readiness to a recent luncheon.

Devereux’s Residential Treatment Center in Scottsdale hosted a luncheon following an eight-week Culinary Arts program, according to a press release, noting youths obtain their Arizona Food Handler’s certificate, coinciding with July’s Culinary Arts Month observation.

“This specialized program for at-risk youth is an opportunity generator,” said Frank Castillo, director of residential services at Devereux Arizona, in a prepared statement. “The skills these youth learn and having them come out of the program with their food handler’s card, we are assisting in the preparation for employment.”

This year, two classes of youth graduated from the program, which culminated with a luncheon to show their culinary skills from menu planning and food prep, to table setting and serving, the release said.

Devereux’s culinary program participants experience real-world dining while sharing their talents. The luncheon was on July 8 with 30 guests attending and four youth completing the program. A future luncheon has not been scheduled yet.

Devereux Arizona’s Culinary Arts Program is a cohort of youth living on a 10-acre campus at its Residential Treatment Center, providing at-risk youth with meaningful learning experiences. Luncheon themes and menu items vary per program.

“Along with the new cooking skills learned during the program, these children can build self-confidence, learn about teamwork, safety, public speaking and exposure to different cultures and cuisines,” Castillo said.

Devereux’s Residential Treatment Center — a 52-bed center for ages 5-17 who live and attend school while receiving treatment for emotional, mental, behavioral and/or substance abuse challenges — a Level 1 therapeutic facility, is noted to be Arizona’s only facility providing youth with special programming in a safe environment to heal.

Devereux Arizona began a therapeutic day school in 1967. The RTC was established in 1978 as a 32-bed center before expanding to 52 beds with the new Marley Dormitory in July 2019. Devereux Arizona began providing services in 1967 with the opening of a therapeutic day school in Scottsdale.

The center helps more than 4,500 individuals and their families statewide.
Devereux Arizona is a Qualifying Charitable Nonprofit, according to the release. 

Visit DevereuxArizona.org or call 602-283-1573 to learn more.

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