Peoria spends $390,000 to remove corrosion at one of its water treatment plants

Posted 7/13/20

The city of Peoria had to recently spend $390,000 to remove corrosion at one of its water treatment plants.

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Peoria spends $390,000 to remove corrosion at one of its water treatment plants

Posted

The city of Peoria had to recently spend $390,000 to remove corrosion at one of its water treatment plants.

The funds allowed for the removal of significant amounts of microbiological corrosion within the reclaimed water reservoir and tank adjacent to the Butler Wastewater Reclamation Facility, as well as additional piping and instrumentation for the facility.

The city’s water services department recently built a one million gallon per day aquifer storage recovery well next to the Butler Wastewater Reclamation Facility that allows for recharging of treated wastewater effluent into the groundwater aquifer below Peoria.

While completing the final portion of this project, the contractor discovered the corrosion within the existing reclaimed water reservoir and tank. In addition, during start-up testing, the project team identified the need for additional piping and instrumentation to fully maximize the well’s functionality. Because of this, action was taken to immediately remove the corrosion and rehabilitate both the reclaimed water reservoir and the tank, and make the necessary instrumentation and piping adjustments. Not doing so would have resulted in a failed well due to clogging, according to city documents.

The Butler facility produces highly treated reclaimed water, which among other things, is used to irrigate the landscape at Pioneer Community Park.

In May 2018, city staff hired MGC Contractors, Inc., to provide construction services for the equipping of the new well. This contract began with pre-construction services and was amended in October 2018 to provide for construction of the project. The contract was again amended in September 2019 to provide for additional design and needed construction services between the new well site and Pioneer Park Lake.

Philip Haldiman can be reached at 623-876-3697, phaldiman@newszap.com, or on Twitter @philiphaldiman.

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