Richer: Reflecting on 100 days at the Recorder’s Office

Posted 4/29/21

A newly elected president is said to have a 100-day honeymoon period before entering a routinely chaotic and combative political arena. I’d hoped the same courtesy would extend to a newly elected Recorder. It did not.

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, subscribers will receive unlimited access to the website, including access to our Daily Independent e-edition, which features Arizona-specific journalism and items you can’t find in our community print products, such as weather reports, comics, crossword puzzles, advice columns and so much more six days a week.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor

Richer: Reflecting on 100 days at the Recorder’s Office

Posted

A newly elected president is said to have a 100-day honeymoon period before entering a routinely chaotic and combative political arena. I’d hoped the same courtesy would extend to a newly elected Recorder.

It did not.

On my third day in office — Jan. 6 — I sent staff home due to protests and security concerns. On my seventh day, I received a subpoena at 4 p.m. demanding my appearance at the State Capitol the next morning. On my eighth day, I received my first death threat.

In my third week, I presented a budget request for the entire following fiscal year. In my sixth and seventh weeks, I helped oversee and scrutinize the work of the two independent firms evaluating county ballot tabulation equipment. In my ninth week, we successfully concluded the city of Goodyear election.

In my 10th week, I was accused of shredding ballots for an election that I didn’t run, that were securely stored in a continuously videoed internal room I don’t have access to; and that, but for legal disputes, would have ordinarily been long gone by the time I took office. Ostensibly I did all of that to cover up for my political opponent, whom I’d spent the last 12 months criticizing.

Amidst this chaos and craziness, however, I’ve come to love both an office and a staff. It is truly a privilege to be here. The work we do at the Recorder’s Office and Elections Department is fundamental to our economic liberties (through the recordation of property interests) and our civil liberties (through the registration of voters and administration of elections).

The staff boasts many talented professionals who are passionate about the subject matter. Quite a few have been with the office for over 20 years and have developed an unbelievable library of knowledge. I learn from them every day.

Also amidst the chaos and craziness, we’ve notched successes and launched exciting new projects.

Moving forward we’ll provide similar quarterly updates.

Additionally, at the end of the second quarter we will assemble two advisory boards — one for recording, and one for voter registration and elections — with whom we will share our report in order to solicit feedback from a broad range of industries, groups and philosophies.

Thank you for the opportunity.

Republican Stephen Richer is Maricopa County Recorder.

Richer, recorder

Comments