City Council

Scottsdale, Phoenix make slight amendment to backup water agreement

Posted 7/16/20

An emergency backup water delivery agreement between Phoenix and Scottsdale will undergo some changes thanks to the third amendment to the formal agreement.

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City Council

Scottsdale, Phoenix make slight amendment to backup water agreement

Posted

An emergency backup water delivery agreement between Phoenix and Scottsdale will undergo some changes thanks to the third amendment to the formal agreement.

The Scottsdale City Council approved on consent the third amendment to the cities’ agreement at its June 30 meeting. The amendment allows for a treat and wheel method of delivery, which allows Scottsdale to provide Phoenix with raw water supplies that will wheel through the Phoenix system to Scottsdale as an emergency backup source of water.

Scottsdale will provide Phoenix physical water resources, which will undergo treatment at Phoenix’s Val Vista Water Treatment Plant. Phoenix will then deliver that water to Scottsdale’s emergency backup water connection.

Scottsdale agrees to pay Phoenix for the service. Phoenix will base costs on the actual capital, operating and maintenance costs of diverting, treating and transporting the water according to a cost-of-service study.

Scottsdale will also pay Phoenix a water rate of equal to that of customers outside of Phoenix.

Scottsdale and Phoenix entered into the original agreement in 2008, providing emergency backup water service to Scottsdale.

The first amendment came in 2011, which addressed Phoenix’s abandonment of a 60-inch diameter water main. The cities amended the agreement further in 2018 to add an additional 10 years to the service.

City staff say this opportunity provides a cost-effective way of allowing Scottsdale an emergency water connection and supply while reserving Phoenix’s raw water source for its customers.

City staff say the use of the emergency connection is rare but having one in place is mutually beneficial for both cities.

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