DROUGHT

Phoenix leaders upset water cuts fail to include 5 other states

Posted 8/17/22

Phoenix officials are displeased with the federal government’s decision not to include all seven basin states in its Colorado River water cuts.

The reduction in water draws from the river …

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DROUGHT

Phoenix leaders upset water cuts fail to include 5 other states

Posted

Phoenix officials are displeased with the federal government’s decision not to include all seven basin states in its Colorado River water cuts.

The reduction in water draws from the river affect Arizona and Nevada.

In June, according to a city of Phoenix release, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation stated that to save the Colorado River system additional cuts across all basin states would be necessary.

“However, today’s announcement did not include a basin state plan to reduce demand or a federal unilateral action to save the Colorado River,” the release stated. “Given the serious circumstances on the Colorado River, this lack of action is disappointing.”

The other basin states are California, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming.

Phoenix officials said they would continue to advocate for additional collaboration throughout the Colorado River Basin, and the city “has demonstrated its commitment to sustainability and stability.

“In 2022 alone, Phoenix voluntarily gave up 23% of its available Colorado River entitlements to stabilize water levels in Lake Mead and help Pinal farmers who lost access to Colorado River supplies.” 

Officials said the city is committed to provide water to 1.7 million customers and is taking steps to ensure water deliveries and reduce dependence on the Colorado River.

“Phoenix will soon complete the Drought Pipeline Project at a cost of over $300 million, which will move alternate supplies to North Phoenix customers who rely on Colorado River water,” the release stated.

“Phoenix is continuously improving infrastructure and conducting ecosystem restoration in the Salt River system, which provides 60% of the city’s water. Water recycling and efficiency improvements are also important solutions.”

The city declared a Stage 1 Water Alert and activated its Drought Management Plan on June 1 and is asking customers to voluntarily reduce their water use.