HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Robson Communities expert offers tips to improve brain health

Posted 12/10/20

According to the CDC, 1 in 9 adults aged 45 or older report confusion or memory loss, but there are small changes you can make now to improve your brain health for the rest of your life.

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Robson Communities expert offers tips to improve brain health

Collective consciousness, artwork.
Collective consciousness, artwork.
[Metro Creative Connection]
Posted

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in nine adults aged 45 or older report confusion or memory loss, but there are small changes you can make now to improve your brain health for the rest of your life.

Lois Moncel, director of fitness and wellness for Robson Resort Communities, offers the following tips to improve brain health:

• Recent studies show exercises and activities that include both mental and physical demands (dual training) see more of an increase in cognitive improvement versus those who engage in only mental exercise (playing brain games) or those who participate in an exercise that only demands physical exertion, (walking on a treadmill).

• Think about participating in activities that not only work your body but force you to think at the same time. Try to find a form of exercise that forces you to remember a pattern or sequence,  or form a strategy while you are physically exerting energy. Examples include tai chi, sports, dance, boxing, and coordination/motor fitness.

• Make it a goal for yourself in the next few months to explore new ways to exercise that not only challenges your body physically, but forces you to focus, pay attention, test your memory, and increase your cognitive speed.

Ms. Moncel advises that anyone experiencing mental decline or experiencing issues make and appointment to see their physician.

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