Log in

Neighbors

Apache Junction father, son seeking donations for a 2-wheelchair van

Posted 5/31/24

Apache Junction residents Michael and Donivan Hicks are a father and son facing medical challenges who are fundraising with the nonprofit Help Hope Live for an accessible van that can safely hold two …

You must be a member to read this story.

Join our family of readers for as little as $5 per month and support local, unbiased journalism.


Already have an account? Log in to continue.

Current print subscribers can create a free account by clicking here

Otherwise, follow the link below to join.

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe. The five stories do not include our exclusive content written by our journalists.

For $6.99, less than 20 cents a day, digital subscribers will receive unlimited access to YourValley.net, including exclusive content from our newsroom and access to our Daily Independent e-edition.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor
Neighbors

Apache Junction father, son seeking donations for a 2-wheelchair van

Posted

Apache Junction residents Michael and Donivan Hicks are a father and son facing medical challenges who are fundraising with the nonprofit Help Hope Live for an accessible van that can safely hold two wheelchairs.

They are homebound until they can secure a wheelchair van. While a van will improve their safety and access to medical care as well as their community, insurance doesn’t cover the cost. That means they are on the hook for roughly $64,000 out-of-pocket, according to a release.

A total of $3,900 has been raised as of May 31 from a $64,000 goal, it states at https://helphopelive.org/campaign/23438/.

Unlike a GoFundMe campaign, donations to Help Hope Live are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law, and all funds raised will be managed by the nonprofit to cover verified medical and related expenses. Help Hope Live verifies medical and financial need for every patient.

Help Hope Live is a national nonprofit that specializes in engaging communities in secure, tax-deductible fundraising campaigns for people who need a transplant or are affected by a catastrophic injury or illness. Since 1983, campaigns organized by Help Hope Live have raised more than $181 million to pay patient expenses.

Michael Hicks and his wife, Angie, have been married for 43 years. Their second child, Donivan, was born with a missing chromosome; today, he is 41 and relies on a trach, a feeding tube and 24/7 caregiving to stay healthy, according to a release.

“He is non-verbal and unable to do anything on his own,” Angie Hicks said in the release, “but he is still one of the happiest people I know.”

When Michael Hicks was 26 he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. He is now reliant on a wheelchair for mobility, the release states.

Michael and Donivan Hicks need safe and reliable transportation and to protect Angie Hick’s safety as she serves as their caregiver, it states.

“The possibility of me injuring myself or them while I’m trying to transfer them into our car is a real fear,” Angie Hicks said in the release. “Who will care for them if that happens?”

That’s why they turned to the national medical fundraising nonprofit Help Hope Live, it states in the release.

“We are a family that rarely asks for help,” Angie Hicks said in the release. “But our backs are against the wall on this one. A wheelchair van will give them the quality of care they deserve and the quality of life they need. It will be priceless for all of us.”