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SRP staff talks history of canals at Tempe presentation

Posted 1/8/24

Staff from Salt River Project will discuss the history of the oldest in-use irrigation canals in the Valley during a  presentation this week in Tempe.

Topics include the San Francisco …

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MUSEUM

SRP staff talks history of canals at Tempe presentation

Posted

Staff from Salt River Project will discuss the history of the oldest in-use irrigation canals in the Valley during a  presentation this week in Tempe.

Topics include the San Francisco Canal, the Tempe Canal Company, McKinney-Kirkland Ditch, as well as early Valley developers and their roles in Arizona water history, and how SRP preserves and interprets canals for the public.


SRP staff will also take guests on a “virtual ghost-hunt for the telltale signs of ancient and historic canals that have been incorporated into the urban landscape but can still be traced when you know just what to look for,” according to a release. 

The free talk. 11:30 a.m. at the Tempe History Museum, 809 E. Souhthern Ave., is presented by the Tempe History Society with support from Friendship Village.