EDUCATION

Shadow Ridge junior a future leader delegate

Posted 12/31/20

Kiersten Baker, a junior at Shadow Ridge High School was selected as a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want …

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EDUCATION

Shadow Ridge junior a future leader delegate

Posted

Kiersten Baker, a junior at Shadow Ridge High School was selected as a delegate to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders.

The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country interested in these careers, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal.

Kiersten’s nomination was signed by Dr. Mario Capecchi, winner of the Nobel Prize in Medicine and the Science Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Shadow Ridge High School based on her academic achievement, leadership potential, and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

During the two-day Congress, Kiersten will join students from across the country and hear Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science Winners talk about leading medical research; be given advice from Ivy League and top medical school deans on what to expect in medical school; witness stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; be inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learn about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology.

The Academy offers free services and programs to students who want to become physicians or go into medical science. Services offered by the program include online social networks through which future doctors and medical scientists can communicate; opportunities for students to be guided and mentored by physicians and medical students; and communications for parents and students on college acceptance and finances, skills acquisition, internships, career guidance.

Kiersten is currently taking Honors Algebra 3/4, Advanced Placement Chemistry, Dual Enrollment English, Advanced Dance, Honors History and is a third year Engineering student. She is also active in dance, dedicating 20 plus hours a week dancing competitively, and serves as a teacher’s assistant with her dance company.

Kiersten holds a 4.308 GPA and is considering Arizona State University, University of New Mexico and Texas A&M for college with Chemical or Biomedical Engineering as a major.

The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists was founded on the belief that we must identify prospective medical talent at the earliest possible age and help these students acquire the necessary experience and skills to take them to the doorstep of this vital career and to identify, encourage and mentor students who wish to devote their lives to the service of humanity as physicians and medical scientists.

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