SEWING

These little gems still sparkle

Posted 6/15/22

The Singer Sewing Company introduced its small Featherweight sewing machine in a big way — in 1934 at the Chicago World’s Fair.

Tailors loved these Featherweights because they came in …

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SEWING

These little gems still sparkle

Posted

The Singer Sewing Company introduced its small Featherweight sewing machine in a big way — in 1934 at the Chicago World’s Fair.

Tailors loved these Featherweights because they came in a sturdy carrying case no bigger than a makeup suitcase. Homemakers desired these machines, too.

Singer had produced between 3 million and 3.5 million Featherweights when their U.S. production ended in 1961. Factories in Canada and Scotland continued production until 1969.

Barb Brady hosts the monthly Featherweight Meet and Greet at Sun City West’s Rip ’N’ Sew Club. The gathering is open to Rip ’N’ Sew members who own a Featherweight machine and want to learn more about it.

At their June gathering, members worked on sewing with the machines. July’s topic will be machine maintenance.

Although black was the predominant color of Featherweights, they also came in pale turquoise and tan. No matter their color, these little machines can sell today for hundreds even thousands of dollars. Their original cost from the 1930s to 1950s was $125 to $150.

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