North County welcomes new member to board

Sambol sworn in during ceremony

Posted

There is a new face on the Arizona Fire & Medical Authority Board of Directors.

North County Fire and Medical District Board of Directors conducted a swearing-in ceremony as 15-year Sun City West resident Tony Sambol stepped up to fill the place of former director Dick Cherry, who passed away in October 2019. Mr. Sambol will serve the remainder of 2020.

The NCFMD is part of the Arizona Fire & Medical Authority, which also includes the South County Fire and Medical District. Collectively, they serve Sun City West, Wittmann, Sun Lakes and the Tonopah Valley.

Prior to residing in the community, he worked in California for the Southern California Edison Co. for 30 years. Mr. Sambol describes himself as a guy who likes to volunteer in his community.

“I served on the Sun City West Posse for 10 years and also at Surprise Sunset Rotary Club, giving back is just a part of my life,” he said. “It is important to me and important to the people I live with.”

Serving a community is in the hearts of many people, according to Mr. Sambol. Service looks different to each individual and for those members who serve on the North County Fire and Medical District board, emergency services is their passion, he added, not only ensuring exceptional service is provided to the community, but also protecting taxpayer dollars and ensuring the longevity of their assets.

Mr. Sambol admits his first meeting he felt like a fish out of water, but he understands he is in the learning stage and it’s important he doesn’t talk as much as other board members because they have the experiences and know what they are talking about.

“For the success of the authority we need to have elected officials that have the passion for emergency services and also making sure we are being good stewards of taxpayer dollars,” Deputy Chief Eric Kriwer said.

Mr. Sambol said getting community members involved with the authority is important, so they understand what they do. He said it’s the only way to relate and using face-to-face opportunities and public media to help the community understand where their tax dollars go.

“Sometimes we can articulate as a first responder. But our board members can speak to the community  and answer questions to help them understand the depth,” Mr. Kriwer said. “A lot of times people don’t use 911 until the worst day of their life and we want to make sure they know us other than that. Having elected officials who are educated on what we do and how we operate help us to have a top-notch department.”

Transparency is important to the authority and Mr. Sambol said in his short experiences he has witnessed truthfulness and the diversity with people from different areas and backgrounds make it successful.

Comments

X