OPINION

Konopko: Rec centers efforts are drop in bucket

Posted 9/21/22

I read the front page article (“Rec centers cutting water use,” Sun City West Independent, Aug. 31, 2022).

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OPINION

Konopko: Rec centers efforts are drop in bucket

Posted

I read the front page article (“Rec centers cutting water use,” Sun City West Independent, Aug. 31, 2022). 

Compared to all of the water used in our state, these water usage savings will be a proverbial drop in the bucket.

Here is a plan that will truly work, but no one will like it.

  1. A temporary ban on new building permits. New home growth has been booming but we do not have the water for these in the long run.
  2. Every home and business needs to have a WiFi-
    enabled water meter so the water company can detect leaks quickly.
  3. Ornamental grass has to go.
  4. California needs to trade its Colorado water allotment for funds paid by the other states that use this water to build and operate desalinization plants.
  5. To make up for the inevitable loss of hydroelectric power, the states like ours need to build more solar farms in order to avoid blackouts in the future.

The bottom line is that it’s hard for me to understand why I can’t water my lawn when the government allows a water park to be built and to continue to operate during this drought emergency.

Martin Konopko

Sun City West