Opinion

Guest Commentary: Golfers need to know their options to improve

Posted 1/8/21

I am excited when golfers approach me saying, “I can’t hit my driver, it doesn’t work the way I think it should.”

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Opinion

Guest Commentary: Golfers need to know their options to improve

Posted

I am excited when golfers approach me saying, “I can’t hit my driver, it doesn’t work the way I think it should.”

This statement gives me options to help them. Many golfers look for the “magic golf club” or the “magic move” in their golf swing, which can limit their options. I like to take a different approach.

The Golf LAB at Grandview Golf Course, 14260 W. Meeker Blvd., is what I call the golfers toy box. Often, golfers recognize a “golf lesson” as the method to get out of a slump or get their game back on track. My belief is that assessing the equipment first and the golf swing last creates a more efficient learning experience. The quickest fix for a golfer is to modify the existing golf club or simply present its intended use more clearly. That is our approach at the Golf LAB.

That approach can lead us to the club fitting environment. This is where the club head style, shaft specifications and other variables are matched to a golfers natural swing tendencies. This information is generated with the experience of the club fitter, the aid of today’s launch monitor technology and other diagnostic tools. If a custom fit golf club (try before you buy) does not fix the problem, then we need to assess how you are using that club.

I call this part of the process “Equipment-Based Instruction.” As it relates to hitting the driver well, I make sure a golfer’s setup posture matches the shaft plane, I look for the low point of the swing arc to be behind the ball and I want the swing motion to match the plane. These are just a few very technical aspects that most people may not be familiar with, though, I think they are the most important components to playing better golf. Every club may not use the same swing concept.

When the equipment-based approach does not help you improve your game, we then need to look at developing skills instead of assuming your swing mechanics are at fault. My ability to present a skill effectively and monitor how golfers practice in order to develop that skill becomes the most important part of my job. This technical aspect of golf is why I love the game, share it with others and feel blessed that my recreation is my career.

My fellow golf professionals and I are here to give you options to improve your game. Golfers should never run out of options because the golf industry will always develop new technology and more options.

Editor’s Note: David Arend is the owner-operator of the Golf Lab at Grandview Golf Course.

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