New dinosaur discoveries explained at Nat Geo Live event

EDUCATION

Posted 2/17/21

Groundbreaking new science is changing how people thought dinosaurs looked, moved and lived. Join the Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts for the next virtual National Geographic Live event, …

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New dinosaur discoveries explained at Nat Geo Live event

EDUCATION

Posted

Groundbreaking new science is changing how people thought dinosaurs looked, moved and lived. Join the Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts for the next virtual National Geographic Live event, “Reimagining Dinosaurs,” Tuesday, Feb. 23.

Bringing new discoveries from around the globe direct to living rooms, the conversation features paleontologists Nizar Ibrahim and Sebastián Rozadilla as they share stories about their roles in the evolving science of dinosaurs.

Newfound troves of fossils from the Moroccan desert suggest that the immense predator Spinosaurus used crocodile-like jaws and a unique, paddle-like tail to actively pursue its prey in the water: a first for dinosaurs. And in Chile, scientists have discovered a shocking new dinosaur. Unlike its cousins, Velociraptor and T. rex, Chilesaurus consumed a vegetarian diet.

German/Moroccan paleontologist and anatomist, Nizar Ibrahim scours the deserts of North Africa for clues to life in the Cretaceous period, when the area was a large river system teeming with life. In addition to unearthing spectacular dinosaur bones, huge prehistoric fish, ferocious crocodile-like hunters, and the largest predatory dinosaur known, Mr. Ibrahim has discovered fossil footprints and a new species of flying reptile with an 18-foot wingspan that lived 95 million years ago.

Born in Argentina, from an early age Sebastián Rozadilla had a fascination with nature. He is currently pursuing his doctoral thesis on bird evolution. Exploring and traveling the continent in search of new fossil remains, Sebastián also enjoys drawing these lost worlds and bringing these extinct creatures to life through his artwork.

The 60-minute virtual event will include short videos narrated by Mr. Ibrahim and Mr. Rozadilla, and a live, moderated conversation about the intriguing changes in paleontology and the science of dinosaurs. There will also be opportunities for audience questions and answers.

Tickets for the February 23 Nat Geo Live event are $20. Only one ticket per household is needed for viewing. Call the Webb Center Box Office at 928-684-6624 or visit dewpac.org to reserve tickets and for a schedule of upcoming events. There is a $5 virtual program delivery charge per ticket whether purchased by phone or online.

The National Geographic Live Speaker Series brings premium storytelling and visually stunning imagery to audiences with first-hand accounts of science, adventure, and discovery told by world-class explorers who inspire change in the world.

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