Tucson business co-owner could get prison term in tax case

Posted 4/15/21

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A Tucson business co-owner who has already paid nearly $1.1 million in restitution to the federal government could be sentenced to up to a year in prison after pleading guilty …

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Tucson business co-owner could get prison term in tax case

Posted

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A Tucson business co-owner who has already paid nearly $1.1 million in restitution to the federal government could be sentenced to up to a year in prison after pleading guilty to filing a false income tax return.

Lynda Jean Zimmermann, 49, faces a June 21 sentencing after pleading guilty April 9 in federal court.

Zimmermann with her husband owned a business that provided lightning-detection and warning systems to golf courses, parks and mines, and her plea agreement said she handled the company's finances while her husband ran day-to-day operations.

In her plea agreement, Zimmermann admitted reporting total gross receipts of $1.3 million for the business in 2014, well short of the actual $2.4 million.

The nearly $1.1 million of restitution that her lawyer told a judge has been paid included over $482,000 of taxes due, a fraud penalty of over $361,000 and interest of over $245,000, according to the plea agreement.

As part of the plea agreement, prosecutors agreed not to charge Zimmermann or her husband in connection with false tax returns filed for 2013 and 2015.

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