Tensions between EU and Turkey escalate over Erdogan insults

Posted 10/26/20

BRUSSELS (AP) — Tensions between the European Union and Turkey have risen further after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan questioned the mental state of his French counterpart, Emmanuel …

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, subscribers will receive unlimited access to the website, including access to our Daily Independent e-edition, which features Arizona-specific journalism and items you can’t find in our community print products, such as weather reports, comics, crossword puzzles, advice columns and so much more six days a week.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor

Tensions between EU and Turkey escalate over Erdogan insults

Posted

BRUSSELS (AP) — Tensions between the European Union and Turkey have risen further after Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan questioned the mental state of his French counterpart, Emmanuel Macron.

Several EU officials harshly criticized Erdogan's comments over the weekend and the bloc's executive arm, the European Commission, said on Monday that the Turkish leader should change his approach if he does not want to derail the bloc's attempts at renewed dialogue with his country.

Erdogan said Saturday that Macron needed his head examined. He made the comments during a local party congress, apparently in response to statements Macron made this month about problems created by radical Muslims in France who practice what the French leader termed “Islamist separatism.”

In an unusual move, France announced Saturday it was recalling its ambassador for consultations. The French presidential office noted as well that Turkey had called for a boycott of French products.

The move, if taken to heart, could add a layer of economic ramifications to the deepening diplomatic tussle.

Erdogan added on Sunday that the French leader has “lost his way.”

The spat comes as tensions between France and Turkey have intensified in recent months over issues that include the fighting in Syria, Libya and Nagorno-Karabakh, a region within Azerbaijan that is controlled by ethnic Armenian separatists.

In a message posted on Twitter Sunday, the EU foreign policy chief, Josep Borrell, slammed Erdogan comments as “unacceptable” and urged Turkey to “stop this dangerous spiral of confrontation.”

European Council President Charles Michel blamed Turkey for resorting to “provocations, unilateral actions in the Mediterranean and now “insults."

At a summit earlier this month, EU member states agreed to review Turkey’s behavior in December and threatened to impose sanctions if Erdogan's “provocations" do not stop, a council statement said.

EU spokesman Peter Stano said Monday he did not exclude an urgent meeting of EU ministers at an earlier date following Erdogan’s latest comments.

“We clearly expect a change in action and declarations from the Turkish side,” Stano said at a news conference. He said there would be many discussions “to see whether we are going to continue to wait or take action earlier.”

Still, Stano insisted that Turkey remains a “very important partner” for the 27-nation bloc and that “no one will profit from more confrontation."

The increase in tensions has not helped Turkey’s negotiations on joining the EU, the world’s biggest trade bloc, which began in 2005 but have stood at a standstill in recent years.

Turkey is the EU's fifth largest trading partner and the bloc relies on Ankara to stop migrants from entering the bloc through its borders with Greece and Bulgaria.

Comments