Mortgage rates dip for first time since January

Posted 4/8/21

McLEAN, Va. (AP) — Mortgage rates fell for the first time in more than two months as buyers continue to be stifled by high prices and limited supply.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday …

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, subscribers will receive unlimited access to the website, including access to our Daily Independent e-edition, which features Arizona-specific journalism and items you can’t find in our community print products, such as weather reports, comics, crossword puzzles, advice columns and so much more six days a week.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor

Mortgage rates dip for first time since January

Posted

McLEAN, Va. (AP) — Mortgage rates fell for the first time in more than two months as buyers continue to be stifled by high prices and limited supply.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the benchmark 30-year loan rate dipped to 3.13% this week from 3.18% last week. At this time last year, the long-term rate was 3.33%.

The rate for a 15-year loan, popular among those looking to refinance, fell to 2.42% from 2.45% last week. One year ago it was 2.77%.

Mortgage rates have been historically low for years, but strong demand and low inventory have pushed prices higher.

Last week the National Association of Realtors reported that its index of pending home sales tumbled 10.6% to 110.3 in February, its lowest level since May of 2020. Contract signings are now slightly behind where they were last year after eight straight months of year-over-year gains.

Meanwhile, U.S. home prices rose at the fastest pace in seven years in January, according to the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller 20-city home price index. The pandemic has fueled demand for single-family homes as people look for more space.

Economists expect home loan rates to remain low as the Federal Reserve says it intends to keep its main borrowing rate near zero until the economy recovers from the coronavirus pandemic.

Also Thursday, the Labor Department reported that the number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits rose last week to 744,000, signaling that many employers are still cutting jobs even as more people are vaccinated against COVID-19 and state and local governments lift virus restrictions.

Comments