drought conditions

Mesa enacts water shortage management plan

Posted 5/18/22

Due to historic drought, climate change and over-allocation, conditions on the Colorado River are worsening.

While deeper shortages may come quicker than anticipated, the city of Mesa recognizes …

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drought conditions

Mesa enacts water shortage management plan

Posted

Due to historic drought, climate change and over-allocation, conditions on the Colorado River are worsening.

While deeper shortages may come quicker than anticipated, the city of Mesa recognizes the situation is serious and continues to strategically plan for a future with less water. As a result, the city is declaring a Stage One Water Shortage awareness and enacting its Water Shortage Management Plan, according to a release.

According to the plan, Stage One triggers a “Water Watch” stage with a water system use reduction goal of 5%.

While there will not be mandatory water restrictions in Stage One, this stage of the plan calls for reduction of water use at city facilities, limits on overseeding on city landscaping and launching a public awareness campaign to alert residents to water shortage conditions and the voluntary measures they can take to save water, the release states.

“While Mesa has long prepared for these conditions, it’s imperative that we take any strain on our water sources seriously, as a city, and as responsible residents of our desert environment,” Mayor John Giles said in the release. “The city of Mesa has been a leader in prioritizing sustainable practices, and we continue to increase water conservation efforts to reduce overall impact. In Stage One, we will work with business and residents to demonstrate ways to adapt and learn to use less water.”

Mesa has three primary sources of water that include surface water from the Colorado, Salt and Verde Rivers and groundwater supplies.

The water city residents receive depends on where they live. The city of Mesa has known for many years that Colorado River supplies could be cut.

The city has prepared for shortage through careful planning and proactive investments to build a robust infrastructure and diverse water portfolio, underground water storage and demand management programs. These preparations bring water resiliency and dependability to Mesa, especially during times of shortage, the release states.

“The city’s water portfolio remains robust, and residents can rest assured that this declaration does not mean there will be a shortage at their tap,” Chris Hassert, Mesa water resources director, said in the release.” By making this declaration we are demonstrating Mesa’s commitment to improving conditions on the Colorado River and maintaining a sustainable water supply.”

While water conservation measures are currently voluntary, practical water-wise changes in lifestyle can significantly impact the community’s water future.

Water conservation and efficiency are vital to a sustainable future in the desert. Drought and shortage are not short-term problems. Mesa remains committed to water-wise management and efficient water use to ensure sustainable growth and a thriving economy.

To learn more about Mesa’s water stewardship strategy, go to mesaaz.gov/water.

 

drought, Mesa, water

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