Germany searches premises of spyware maker FinFisher

Posted 10/14/20

BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors said Wednesday that authorities have searched 15 premises linked to spyware maker FinFisher as part of a probe into allegations the Munich-based company broke …

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Germany searches premises of spyware maker FinFisher

Posted

BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors said Wednesday that authorities have searched 15 premises linked to spyware maker FinFisher as part of a probe into allegations the Munich-based company broke export laws by selling its products to authoritarian governments.

Munich prosecutors opened an investigation into the company last year following complaints from human rights groups, which alleged FinFisher had supplied Turkey with software that could be used to spy on dissidents in the country.

A spokeswoman for the prosecutors' office said authorities searched offices and homes linked to the company around Munich and a subsidiary in Romania from Oct. 6-8.

The probe is directed against the chief executive and employees of FinFischer GmbH and two other companies, said spokeswoman Anne Leiding.

“There is a suspicion that software may have been shipped abroad without the necessary approval from the Federal Office of Economics and Export Control,” she said.

FinFisher didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

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