At a glance: College athlete compensation after 6 months

Posted 1/27/22

Two of the main NIL compliance-platform and technology companies, INFLCR and Opendorse, have provided information about NCAA athlete compensation after the first six months (July 1 through Dec. 31, …

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At a glance: College athlete compensation after 6 months

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Two of the main NIL compliance-platform and technology companies, INFLCR and Opendorse, have provided information about NCAA athlete compensation after the first six months (July 1 through Dec. 31, 2021). A glance, by the numbers:

59% vs. 41% — comparison between male athletes in Division I who have NIL activities vs. female athletes, according to INFLCR based on transactions reported by athletes using their system.

5 — women’s sports in the top 10 for NIL activities: track and field, volleyball, basketball, soccer and softball. NIL activities include licensing, social media posts, creating content and making appearances and signing autographs (INFLCR and Opendorse).

6 — women’s sports in the top 10 for NIL compensation: women’s basketball is second overall with 26.2%, and followed by volleyball, softball, track and field, gymnastics and swimming and diving (Opendorse).

67.4% — percentage of Division I male athletes who make up total NIL compensation (Opendorse).

32.6% — percentage of Division I female athletes who make up total NIL compensation (Opendorse).

$1,291 — average compensation for an athlete across Divisions I, II and III (INFLCR).

$1,036 — average compensation for a Division I athlete (Opendorse).

$51 — median compensation for an athlete across Divisions I, II and III (INFLCR).

21.7% — NIL compensation from social media posts (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$933 — average NIL compensation for a YouTube video (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$920 — average NIL compensation for TikTok post (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$2,805 — average NIL compensation for a TikTok post from women’s basketball (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$2,143 — average NIL compensation for a TikTok post from men’s basketball (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$522 — average NIL compensation for Instagram post (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

$1,002 — average NIL compensation for an Instagram post from football (Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper).

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Sources: INFLCR, Opendorse, Opendorse/Front Office Sports white paper

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