Music

Scottsdale student performs in debut orchestra performance

Posted 12/7/22

Cameron Bertolet of Scottsdale performed in Belmont University’s Orchestra in front of an audience of more than 1,200 people at Belmont’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts in Nashville, Tenn.

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Music

Scottsdale student performs in debut orchestra performance

Posted

Cameron Bertolet of Scottsdale performed in Belmont University’s Orchestra in front of an audience of more than 1,200 people at Belmont’s Fisher Center for the Performing Arts in Nashville, Tenn.

On Saturday, Nov. 4, School of Music professor Jeffery Ames debuted his masterwork composition, “Requiem for Colour.” According to a press release, Ames led more than 450 students of Belmont’s Oratorio and orchestra and invited an impressive ensemble of guests to participate in the evening’s dynamic display of storytelling.

Culminated from an idea conceived more than a decade ago, Ames’ labor of love pays musical homage to the sufferers and saviors, the casualties and champions of Black American people in a requiem or mass for the dead.

“We were a huge force of musicians who told the story in a unique manner,” Ames said in the release. “I truly believed God and African ancestors were pleased.”

The premiere musical event was an unforgettable experience for all present, from listening in theater seats to singing to performing under the theater lights, the release continued. What was meant to be a one-night-only performance is starting to grow legs with conversations about additional performances, nationally and internationally.

Located two miles from downtown Nashville, Belmont University comprises nearly 9,000 students from every state and 33 countries.

Cameron Bertolet, Belmont University, orchestra, Jeffery Ames