Scottsdale Artists’ School creatively implements health measures for summer camps

Posted 8/11/20

Scottsdale Artists’ School recently discovered a way to apply health measures for its youth, ages 6-18, attending its on-campus summer camps last week.

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, subscribers will receive unlimited access to the website, including access to our Daily Independent e-edition, which features Arizona-specific journalism and items you can’t find in our community print products, such as weather reports, comics, crossword puzzles, advice columns and so much more six days a week.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor

Scottsdale Artists’ School creatively implements health measures for summer camps

Scottsdale Artists' School is using costumed characters to man the thermometers at the school's entrances as part of a creative way implement health measures during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Scottsdale Artists' School is using costumed characters to man the thermometers at the school's entrances as part of a creative way implement health measures during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Submitted photo
Posted

Scottsdale Artists’ School recently discovered a way to apply health measures for its youth, ages 6-18, attending its on-campus summer camps last week.

“Due to the state of COVID in Arizona, the health of our students is our primary concern and we have a list a mile long of measures we are taking to ensure the safety of all who visit our school,” Trudy Hays, SAS executive director, said in a prepared statement.

A few of these measures include: required face coverings or masks for everyone entering the building, temperature checks taken at all doorways, a different entrance for each studio for check in and check out and pathways marked at 6-foot intervals to encourage social distancing.

In addition, each student was assigned studio equipped with individual supplies and separated at 6-foot distances. A complete list of safety procedures can be found on the SAS website.

In the midst of all the anxieties, rules and regulations, SAS claims it discovered a way to start each camp day in a fun, creative way.

“One morning our program director came in wearing a pink unicorn costume and started taking the students temperatures; everyone, kids and adults, laughed and though it was so great. It took the pressure and fearfulness out of checking temperatures,” Skye Fallon, director of marketing and communications, said in a prepared statement. “Each day after became a new and imaginative way to have fun with health and safety.”

The remainder of the week saw several costumed characters manage the thermometer, the Fairy Godmother appeared with her magic wand, a garden gnome danced a gig, Waldo was found in random locations checking for masks and temps, a minion popped up one day, a Harlem Globe Trotter bounced in, and the favorite was the ghostbuster who boogied up and down the hallway checking for ghostly fevers.

“I never imagined a time wearing a mask and taking temps at work would be a reality,” Ms. Fallon said. “For kids trying to understand this new life, it must be pretty scary. I hope their experience at our school eased that fear. I’m proud of my SAS team for their creativity and imaginations.”

Comments