HVAC tips on keeping cool, safe during summer monsoons

By Dave Wick
Posted 8/5/20

Arizona’s monsoon season spans from June through September bringing higher humidity, heavy rain, lightening, hail, dust storms and extreme heat all of which can wreak havoc on your HVAC system, especially those located on the roof.

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HVAC tips on keeping cool, safe during summer monsoons

Posted

Arizona’s monsoon season spans from June through September bringing higher humidity, heavy rain, lightening, hail, dust storms and extreme heat all of which can wreak havoc on your HVAC system, especially those located on the roof.

With the average temperature around 104 during this time period, a non-working air conditioning can be uncomfortable and dangerous.

The easiest thing you can do to prepare for an increased amount of dust particles in the air, that inevitably will be sucked into your system and dispersed throughout your home, is to change your air filter.

The amount of dust and particles being trapped in your HVAC system can reduce the air flow to your air conditioning and cause poor indoor air quality resulting in allergies and reduced efficiency.

Replace the filters at least once a month and when a monsoon blows through consider replacing them as soon as it passes. Another is to be sure you clean and maintain the area around your unit.

It is recommended that you keep plants, patio furniture, or other outdoor items, at least two feet away from your unit.

To help you prepare, check out the answers to some of the most common questions we get during this time of year:

What should I do if lightning strikes near my home during a monsoon, causing a disruption?
Surges in electricity can damage the components in the air conditioner and lightening doesn’t have to hit the home to cause surges, a lightning strike within a half mile can cause damage. 

A lightning strike can deliver 20,000 volts into through a home, taking out the air conditioning unit. To prevent expense repairs and hot nights, if your unit is damaged invest in a circuit breaker, during extreme electricity changes the breaker will be tripped.  If you have a breaker and come home to a hot house, make sure to check it before calling for a service call.

What should I do if my system won’t turn on?
There are a few things to check if your system is not turning on. First, be sure your AC unit is plugged in and check your circuit breaker – if it trips, don’t force it.

Make sure to also check the batteries in your thermostat regularly. You’ll want to ensure the cooler setting is on, and your fan is on the auto/on mode, as opposed to off.

How does surge in humidity effect my unit?
AC units are designed to help remove moisture from the air. However, when humidity levels increase, most systems can’t keep up. The humidity affects units in a negative way because it decreases the cooling effect. Making your home feel warmer than it is.

Our units in Arizona are not use to sudden change in moisture levels so its important to make sure your system is running efficiently and checked prior to the start of summer.

How often should my system be serviced?
Twice a year, before the heat and before the colder temperatures. If you had your system maintained before the start of the summer season last year, you should not go through the whole summer without doing so again.

We depend upon our air conditioners far too much to force them to go through two long, brutal summer seasons without service. Also, when an AC unit sits idle during the winter, it collects debris. The key to keep it running properly is regular maintenance.

Dave Wick is with Goettl Air Conditioning & Plumbing

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