Did you know: Domestic violence myths, misconceptions debunked

By Kasia Bouise
Posted 3/22/20

There are many myths and misconceptions about domestic violence.

Here are a few common myths, misconceptions and the truth behind them:

Myth: Domestic violence is only physical.

Fact: …

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Did you know: Domestic violence myths, misconceptions debunked

Posted

There are many myths and misconceptions about domestic violence.

Here are a few common myths, misconceptions and the truth behind them:

Myth: Domestic violence is only physical.

Fact: There are many forms of domestic violence besides physical, such as sexual, emotional, isolation, coercion, stalking, financial or economic control, harm to pets, intimidation and threats.

Myth: Men are only abusers.

Fact: Although statistically women are more commonly the victims of domestic violence with one in four women experiencing intimate partner violence, one in seven men will experience physical violence by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime.

Myth: If the victim doesn’t leave, the abuse must not be that bad.

Fact: Victims of domestic violence stay in abusive relationships for several reasons including fear of additional harm or death, lack of money, there may be children involved and lack of outside support, just to name a few.

On average, a victim will leave and return to an abusive relationship seven times, before he/she is able to leave for good or are killed. Leaving an abusive relationship is the most dangerous time for a victim.

If you would like more information about the Department of Victim Services or if you would like to speak with an advocate, contact the City of Scottsdale

Department of Services office at 480-312-4226 Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. or visit scottsdaleaz.gov/victim-services.

Editor’s Note: Kasia Bouise is a victim advocate for the City of Scottsdale Department of Victim Services.

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