Opinion

Rigler: Specialists use contact tracing to curb the spread of COVID-19

Posted 10/6/21

Friday, Oct. 1 was the 10th annual National Disease Intervention Specialists Recognition Day, the day honoring health care professionals who are crucial in the effort to disrupt the transmission of deadly infectious diseases by connecting people who have been exposed to care and services using a method called contact tracing, which has been vital during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe. The five stories do not include our exclusive content written by our journalists.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, digital subscribers will receive unlimited access to YourValley.net, including exclusive content from our newsroom and access to our Daily Independent e-edition.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor
Opinion

Rigler: Specialists use contact tracing to curb the spread of COVID-19

Posted

Friday, Oct. 1 was the 10th annual National Disease Intervention Specialists Recognition Day, the day honoring health care professionals who are crucial in the effort to disrupt the transmission of deadly infectious diseases by connecting people who have been exposed to care and services using a method called contact tracing, which has been vital during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

These dedicated specialists work quickly to notify people of their exposure, link them to testing, and help clients identify realistic strategies for preventing additional exposures.

All of these efforts help to reduce the number of new infections and are designed to protect our most vulnerable populations from becoming exposed to COVID-19.

Disease intervention specialists existed long before the COVID-19 pandemic.

They have responded to rising rates of sexually transmitted diseases, prevented the transmission of tuberculosis, introduced people to HIV prevention and care, and ended foodborne disease outbreaks.

Even though many investigators were pulled away from their routine casework and had to adapt their skills for the COVID-19 response, the need to prevent other infectious diseases in addition to COVID-19 remains.

ADHS appreciates these professionals’ commitment, flexibility, persistence, and sacrifice. Disease investigation is a journey of balancing endemic infections with those that are only just emerging.

Editor's note: Jessica Rigler is assistant director overseeing the Division of Public Health Preparedness at the Arizona Department of Health Services. Visit azdhs.gov.

Comments