Emerging Trends

Making History: Habitat for Humanity builds first 3D-printed home in Tempe

Collaboration seeks solutions to raise equity of affordable housing

Posted 6/11/21

Partnered together, Habitat for Humanity and the city of Tempe, are ushering in the next generation in affordable housing construction as the pair are building a three-dimensional meant for …

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Emerging Trends

Making History: Habitat for Humanity builds first 3D-printed home in Tempe

Collaboration seeks solutions to raise equity of affordable housing

The 3D printer that is constructed by the German-based company PERI shipped its printer to America in March. It was shortly after delivered to Tempe where construction would start right away in May.
The 3D printer that is constructed by the German-based company PERI shipped its printer to America in March. It was shortly after delivered to Tempe where construction would start right away in May.
Submitted Photos
Posted

Partnered together, Habitat for Humanity and the city of Tempe, are ushering in the next generation in affordable housing construction as the pair are building a three-dimensional meant for low-income residents --- the first of its kind in the United States.

Tempe, like much of the nation along with metropolitan Phoenix, is facing affordable housing shortages for families who want to live in the city but fail to meet the monetary standards to purchase a home.

The combined efforts of both Habitat for Humanity and municipal leaders are making history by creating the first 3D home on a lot purchased by the city, with the intention of using it for a future spot to create affordable housing.

The custom, single-story home, will combine the efforts of modern-day traditionalistic construction and 3D technology to create a cost-effective way to provide a solution to the hurdles of homeownership.

“Tempe is known for innovation and this ground-breaking project aligns perfectly with our goal to identify new solutions that accelerate the growth of affordable and workforce housing in our city,” Tempe Mayor Corey Woods said.

“Working with valued partners. We want to ensure that everyone who wants to live Tempe can do so. Beyond our city borders, this project can serve as a model for other communities as we all work to meet critical needs of families who truly are the faces of the growing housing affordability crisis.”

The 3D printer that is constructed by the German-based company PERI shipped its printer to America in March. It was shortly after delivered to Tempe where construction would start right away in May.

“Our PERI 3D construction printing team is incredibly proud to print this home in Tempe for Habitat for Humanity,” Thomas Imbacher, managing director of innovation and marketing for PERI, said.

“Since 2016, PERI has been working intensively on the development of 3D construction. The 3D-printing project in Tempe is now continuing this success story in the USA.”

This 3D construction printer allows workers to be within the construction area while it is in the printing process. This makes the process of manual labor simple such as laying down empty conduits and connections as well as observing the printing process, experts say.

This printed home project outline is tailored for a single-family with three bedrooms and two baths. The livable space is 1,738 square feet while the total project itself is 2,433 square feet.

Although most of the house is 3D printed (70%) the remainder of the house is built in the traditional way.
Since construction is already underway, the homes are expected to be completed as early as in the fall and could even be inhabited by October.

“This fall I can’t wait to see these houses completed, meet the homeowners and see how their lives are permanently transformed through affordable homeownership,” Mayor Woods said.

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