Heard Museum’s ‘Larger Than Memory’ exhibit honors Indigenous artists

Independent Newsmedia
Posted 8/25/20

Presenting fresh, contemporary art ideas, the largest exhibition of current art in the Heard Museum’s 90-year history opens on Sept. 4 and is on display through Jan. 3, 2021 at the Heard Museum in Phoenix.

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Heard Museum’s ‘Larger Than Memory’ exhibit honors Indigenous artists

Little Red Dots by artist, Michael Patten will be among featured works at the Heard Museum's Larger Than Memory exhibit in Phoenix.
Little Red Dots by artist, Michael Patten will be among featured works at the Heard Museum's Larger Than Memory exhibit in Phoenix.
Submitted photo
Posted

Presenting fresh, contemporary art ideas, the largest exhibition of current art in the Heard Museum’s 90-year history opens on Sept. 4 and is on display through Jan. 3, 2021 at the Heard Museum in Phoenix.

Encompassing nearly 13,000 square feet and spanning four gallery spaces, including the Virginia G. Piper Grand Gallery, Larger Than Memory: Contemporary Art from Indigenous North America is an "inspirational and timely exhibition,"  according to a press release.

Organized by Heard Museum's fine arts curator, Erin Joyce and chief curator, Diana Pardue, this exhibition is said to highlight the significant contributions that Indigenous artists have made, and continue to make, to broader culture spanning the last two decades.

Larger Than Memory: Contemporary Art from Indigenous North America has received support from the Henry Luce Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation, and Drs. William and Kathleen L. Howard.

Larger Than Memory features:

  • Largest contemporary art exhibition at the Heard Museum
  • 40+ works of art by 24 artists installed in 13,000 sq. ft. of gallery space
  • World premiere of three new commissioned bodies of work
  • Works on paper, video, sculptural installation, textile installation, painting, photography and more
  • Featured works address the environment, race, gender, equality and power

Since its founding in 1929, the Heard Museum, a private nonprofit organization, has grown in size and stature to become recognized internationally for the quality of its collections, world-class exhibitions, educational programming and festivals, the release noted.

Dedicated to the advancement of American Indian art, the Heard Meuseum presents the stories of American Indian people from a first-person perspective, as well as exhibitions that show the beauty and vitality of traditional and contemporary American Indian art.

Exhibition, event and program funding are supported, in part, by the generosity of Heard Museum members and donors, the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the City of Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

In association with the Smithsonian, the Heard Museum is part of a select group of museums and cultural, educational and arts organizations that share the Smithsonian’s resources with the nation, added the release.

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