Government

Excess funds to be used for Butler facility assessment

$300K will also go to upgrades

Independent Newsmedia
Posted 9/15/20

Peoria will be using funds from an under-budget project to pay for a needed assessment of the Butler Water Reclamation Facility.

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Government

Excess funds to be used for Butler facility assessment

$300K will also go to upgrades

Posted

Peoria will be using funds from an under-budget project to pay for a needed assessment of the Butler Water Reclamation Facility.

The city’s Beardsley Solids Pipeline Rehabilitation project, replacing old pipes on Beardsley Road from 91st to 111th avenues, is now complete and functions as intended. This project, budgeted in the capital improvement program, has an excess of $329,025 remaining.

The city has approved a funds transfer for this money to pay for an electrical assessment and intake rehabilitation projects for the Butler facility.

The electrical assessment will be conducted in fall.

The Butler intake and associated apparatus, such as fine screens, have experienced significant deterioration because of corrosive sewer gases contained in the system.

After an analysis, it was determined that a temporary intake structure is required to allow sewer flows to be diverted around the permanent intake structures, which are slated for rehabilitation in the near future, according to a city report.

Although the excess funds will not completely cover estimated costs for the permanent intake structure’s rehabilitation, they will be sufficient to commence needed design work and better define project costs that can be budgeted in the capital improvement program for a permanent solution, the report stated.

The Butler facility provides wastewater treatment services to approximately two-thirds of Peoria’s customers.
Repairing and replacing equipment is an important part of keeping this facility in peak operating condition and in compliance with all applicable permits and regulatory requirements, according to the city budget.

It was built in 2008 and has undergone several equipment and process upgrades during the past 12 years.

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