Previous marijuana convictions can now be erased

Peoria firm offers ‘expungements’ of previous convictions in some cases

Posted 7/28/21

The new Arizona law that allows for recreational cannabis use at home also allows for previous marijuana use convictions to be erased from the record, as long as the amount in question was under 25 ounces.

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Previous marijuana convictions can now be erased

Peoria firm offers ‘expungements’ of previous convictions in some cases

Posted

The new Arizona law that allows for recreational cannabis use at home also allows for previous marijuana use convictions to be erased from the record, as long as the amount in question was under 25 ounces.

Modern Law, which has locations in Peoria, Mesa, Gilbert, Phoenix and Scottsdale is offering to expunge convictions for $199 for a limited time.

Anyone interested in clearing their marijuana conviction record can go to
MyModernLaw.com/weed to start the process.

The offer is available through the end of September.

Modern Law founder Billie Tarascio said the new rules will open the door for people who were previously barred from applying for certain jobs.

“Previous convictions have limited people in their ability to rent a residence, and be able to vote because a marijuana conviction was on their record,” she said.

The new law was put into effect after the successful passage of Proposition 207, which passed in November 2020.

Charges that can be expunged include the transporting or consuming of 25 ounces or less of marijuana; cultivating, transporting or processing no more than six marijuana plants at your primary residence for your personal use; or transporting, using or possessing paraphernalia related to cultivating, processing, manufacturing or consuming marijuana.

Charges that may not be expunged include driving while under the influence of marijuana, possession more than 12 plants, and selling marijuana plants or edibles outside of a license dispensary.

“There are plenty of good reasons to go through the process to expunge a previous conviction, if it’s possible,” Tarascio said. “In my practice of family law, it can affect a parent’s time with their child if there’s a previous criminal record. In family law, if one of the parents has had a drug or alcohol conviction in the previous 12 months, there’s a presumption by the court against joint legal decision-making.

But now we can expunge that record, and even the playing field for parents.”

It can also keep someone from entering the profession of their choice, like nursing, public safety or education.

And some landlords won’t accept applications from someone with a previous criminal record.

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