COMMUNITY

Centennial softball honors life, legacy of Ashlie Mumma (Rosenberg)

Posted 4/16/21

Centennial softball lost one of its legends in October 2020, when stomach cancer took Ashlie Renee Mumma (Rosenburg).

Before its April 13 game against Sunrise Mountain, the Coyotes honored her …

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COMMUNITY

Centennial softball honors life, legacy of Ashlie Mumma (Rosenberg)

Posted

Centennial softball lost one of its legends in October 2020, when stomach cancer took Ashlie Renee Mumma (Rosenburg).

Before its April 13 game against Sunrise Mountain, the Coyotes honored her memory - and an army of supporters showed up.

Rosenberg, 31, was a 2007 Centennial graduate. Her coach there and current Cactus coach Bartt Underwood was there to speak about her before the game.

"The first day of tryouts her freshman year, I knew she was something special - not so much that she could pitch and play short and play outfield. When we had batting practice five of the first six swings went outta here. Underwood said. "That being said the thing I treasured about Ashlie more than anything was her fighting spirit. She had as much fighting spirit as anybody I've ever met. Sometimes when you coach a long time like me and like Jody (Pruitt) you've fortunate and you have a player like Ashlie. Not just the player, but the person she is."

After high school Rosenberg played for Fresno State University. She settled in Roseville, Calif., and married Ryan Mumma.

Her husband was there for the center as was her son, Diesel, 9. Diesel threw out the opening pitch.

"I feel honored to be asked to be here today. I feel honored that I knew Ashlie. I hope today both teams have the fighting spirit to play until the last out - that's Ashlie Rosenberg," Underwood said.

Underwood said this was the first time he returned to this field for anything related to Centennial softball in 10 years - since his daughter, Taylor, played her senior season in 2011.

Several of her Centennial teammates and other Coyotes softball alumni showed up for the remembrance.

Current Centennial coach Randy Kaye and longtime Coyotes volleyball coach Cari Bauer also spoke. Rosenberg also played volleyball while at Centennial.

"In 25 years I've had the privilege of seeing some amazing female student-athletes come through our school. Ashlie Rosenberg was arguably in the top five as far as being the complete package," Bauer said. "I was fortunate enough to visit her about three weeks before she passed away. There are so many moments of that visit I will never forget. Her face lit up when I walked through that door. She talked about her great high school experience, and a lot of it was because of this environment at Centennial softball."

Centennial softball has dedicated this season to her.

In addition to her husband and son, Ashlie Mumma is survived by her parents, Jay and Tammie Rosenberg; and her siblings Jadie, Maddie, RJ, and Tuscanie.

To learn more about Ashlie's fight, famil journey and faith visit this page. Or seek out the hastag #AshliesArmy.

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