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Town of Paradise Valley manages weeds after rains

Watch out for invasive stinknet

Posted 2/10/24

Paradise Valley Public Works Department is treating weeds within maintenance areas over the next couple of weeks

The biggest nuisance seen throughout the Southwest region of the country is Globe …

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public works

Town of Paradise Valley manages weeds after rains

Watch out for invasive stinknet

Posted

Paradise Valley Public Works Department is treating weeds within maintenance areas over the next couple of weeks

The biggest nuisance seen throughout the Southwest region of the country is Globe Chamomile, more commonly known as stinknet (depicted above), according to the Town Manager’s Weekly Update.

The town has started applying preemergent within right-of-ways and campuses to help prevent weed growth. Unfortunately, with the measurable winter rainfall over the last few weeks the weeds are starting to come through in some areas, the weekly newsletter stated.

With quick action of pulling the weeds or applying herbicide, the weeds can be eliminated, especially the invasive stinknet. According to the Arizona Department of Agriculture, stinknet is considered a “high priority pest." The invasive stinknet has been known to out-compete other natural plants for the nutrients within the soils. This weed also dies in the summer months, becoming fuel for potential fires.