News

New City Council district boundaries in Mesa

Posted 11/22/21

By unanimous vote, Mesa City Council on Nov 15 approved the recommended map for the new City Council district boundaries.

The new map, recommended by Mesa’s nonpartisan redistricting …

To Our Valued Readers –

Visitors to our website will be limited to five stories per month unless they opt to subscribe. The five stories do not include our exclusive content written by our journalists.

For $5.99, less than 20 cents a day, digital subscribers will receive unlimited access to YourValley.net, including exclusive content from our newsroom and access to our Daily Independent e-edition.

Our commitment to balanced, fair reporting and local coverage provides insight and perspective not found anywhere else.

Your financial commitment will help to preserve the kind of honest journalism produced by our reporters and editors. We trust you agree that independent journalism is an essential component of our democracy. Please click here to subscribe.

Sincerely,
Charlene Bisson, Publisher, Independent Newsmedia

Please log in to continue

Log in
I am anchor
News

New City Council district boundaries in Mesa

A “Welcome to Mesa” sign on Mesa Drive.
A “Welcome to Mesa” sign on Mesa Drive.
City of Mesa
Posted

By unanimous vote, Mesa City Council on Nov 15 approved the recommended map for the new City Council district boundaries.

The new map, recommended by Mesa’s nonpartisan redistricting commission, takes effect immediately and is available to view at mesaaz.gov/government/redistricting.

The redistricting commission, a five-member citizen panel created by mandate of the Mesa city charter, held a series of public outreach meetings, an online survey, an online mapping tool and other forms of community outreach to complete the recommended map for new Council district boundaries, based on how local populations have changed.

Key outcomes from the new map, according to the release, include:

  • Maintains as many neighborhoods as possible within the same district. Superstition Springs, Washington-Escobedo, Mesa Grande and the Evergreen Historic District were among neighborhoods kept intact.
  • Unites historic neighborhoods of the city into District 4, which includes downtown and areas near downtown.
  • District 6 in southeast Mesa is slightly under-populated to help account for the planned growth over the next decade in this area of the city.

Every 10 years, local governments — including the city of Mesa — use new Census data to redraw their City Council district lines based on population shifts. Delivery of U.S. Census data by the federal government was delayed several months compared to prior decades due to the pandemic.

Comments

No comments on this item Please log in to comment by clicking here