Litchfield Park museum closed during the pandemic, but you can still ‘visit’

Posted 7/17/20

The Litchfield Park Historical Society Museum, 13912 W. Camelback Road, is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but that isn’t stopping its volunteers from exhibiting its displays.

The …

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Litchfield Park museum closed during the pandemic, but you can still ‘visit’

Posted

The Litchfield Park Historical Society Museum, 13912 W. Camelback Road, is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but that isn’t stopping its volunteers from exhibiting its displays.

The Litchfield Park Historical Society and Museum’s YouTube channel has started a series of videos about the museum and current exhibits.

“We thought it might be kind of fun to show some behind the scenes things at the museum while everybody is spending more time at home,” Litchfield Park Historical Society Museum archivist Judy Cook says in one of the museum’s offerings.

Another video features docent John Donahue hosting a tour of the exterior of the museum, including the history of the building and some of its artifacts.

The museum is housed in what is affectionately dubbed “Aunt Mary’s House.”

“Paul Litchfield built this house for his sister-in-law, Mary Brinton Tubbs, and they moved in in January 1941. And Mary and her husband, who had retired, were the groundskeepers for all of this land,” explains Mr. Donahue.

The museum is continuing to monitor health recommendations in the hopes of reopening soon.

Follow the museum’s Facebook page, @litchfieldparkmuseum, for updates or email office@lphsMuseum.org

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