HELP NEEDED

Glendale Salvation Army center accepting donations for Ian relief

Posted 9/29/22

If you’re looking to help those on the east coast impacted by Hurricane Ian, there are ways to contribute here in Glendale.

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HELP NEEDED

Glendale Salvation Army center accepting donations for Ian relief

Posted

If you’re looking to help those on the east coast impacted by Hurricane Ian, there are ways to contribute here in Glendale.

The local Salvation Army, at 6010 W. Northern Ave., said Thursday that monetary donations can be made on site. According to the local representative, 100% of donations go toward helping those in need.

At this time, she added, the center is not accepting actual items for donation. She explained that money is the most useful contributions at the present time for quickest assistance.

Click here or call 623-934-0469.

Also, the American Red Cross Arizona and New Mexico Region, which is headquartered in Phoenix, is accepting donations. Click here to help.

In Florida, rescue crews piloted boats and waded through inundated streets Thursday to save thousands of residents trapped amid flooded homes and shattered buildings left by Hurricane Ian, which crossed into the Atlantic Ocean and churned toward another landfall in South Carolina.

Hours after weakening to a tropical storm while crossing the Florida peninsula, Ian regained hurricane strength Thursday evening after emerging over the Atlantic Ocean. The National Hurricane Center predicted it would make landfall in South Carolina as a Category 1 hurricane Friday.

The devastation inflicted on Florida began to come into focus a day after Ian struck as a monstrous Category 4 hurricane and one of the strongest storms ever to hit the U.S. It flooded homes on both the state’s coasts, cut off the only bridge to a barrier island, destroyed a historic waterfront pier and knocked out electricity to 2.67 million Florida homes and businesses — nearly a quarter of utility customers.

The Florida Health Care Association says 43 nursing homes evacuated about 3,400 residents as of Thursday morning, mostly in southwest Florida, even as winds and water from Hurricane Ian began receding.

 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

Glendale, Arizona, Salvation Army, Hurricane Ian