Montroy: Thoughts on health care reform

Posted 9/23/20

Health care is once again top of mind for voters, especially as Election Day approaches.

Like many of us, I have lost loved ones to COVID-19. As a union member, I understand how important this …

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Montroy: Thoughts on health care reform

Posted

Health care is once again top of mind for voters, especially as Election Day approaches.

Like many of us, I have lost loved ones to COVID-19. As a union member, I understand how important this issue is for Arizona families. I also know how easily efforts to reform health care can go wrong. What sounds good on paper doesn’t always translate well to reality.

Take the public option or any one of the other government-controlled health care proposals being floated these days. These kinds of one-size-fits-all approaches to health care will end up increasing taxes without producing results for the taxpayer.

With a price tag in the tens of trillions of dollars range, some estimates conclude that just paying for the public option could require a massive increase in payroll taxes on the average American worker. In return, Americans would face longer waiting times and a lower standard of care as hospitals and other health care facilities would be left to deal with devastating payment cuts to providers.

This is not what I call health care reform. Instead of throwing out the baby with the bathwater, policymakers should seek out practical solutions that will strengthen our current health care system and make it more affordable and accessible for all.

Patrick Montroy
Mesa

health, reform

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